Walking meetings, anyone?

Let 5 eminent leaders convince you that walking meeting is a better idea     2 min read        Count this for yourself - how much time do you spend sitting on your desk in a day?  Quite a lot, right?    With technology at our disposal, we no longer need to put in too much physical efforts in getting things done now, as compared to let’s say 10 or 20 years back. We can get 100 things done without leaving the comfort of our throne. The point is - we are far too comfortable for our own good. Many of the ailments which were unheard till the previous generation have become rampant and are detrimental to our lives today, only because the activities that required us to be on our feet, literally, have dropped drastically. According to a WHO study, approximately 2 million deaths per year are attributed to physical inactivity. This research prompted WHO to issue a warning that a sedentary lifestyle could very well be among the 10 leading causes of death and disability in the world.    What we don’t realize is that, with simple changes in our choices, we can reverse the technology hangover and its offshoots. One way is - walking meetings. There’s no rule that says you can’t walk your meetings. Take quick strolls with your colleagues for ideation/brainstorm meetings, or important discussions. You can also request your clients or agencies for a walk for the meetings that don’t require a fancy presentation, projectors, and the whole enchilada.    Still, don’t think it’s a great idea? Let these 5 eminent leaders convince you to reconsider.      1 Aristotle   The great thinker, apparently, instructed students while strolling about. Come to think of it, this is one of the reasons why his students were called “Peripatetics.”      2 Sigmund Freud   The father of psychoanalysis conducted a number of walking analyses, according to ‘Freud: A Life for Our Time’. In 1907, he conducted his first training analysis on Max Eitingon through a series of evening walks. Eitingon late became the president of the International Psychoanalytic Association.      3 Steve Jobs   One of the biggest innovators of our times, Steve Jobs was a big fan of walking meetings and insisted on long walks for serious conversations.      4 Harry S. Truman   Walking was a fundamental part of Harry S. Truman’s daily routine. The 33rd president of the United States, according to the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, woke up at five in the morning for a “vigorous” walk “wearing a business suit and tie!”      5 Charles Dickens   It’s widely known that the eminent writer was actually “a compulsive walker”. Dickens despised sitting on his desk. He walked around 20 miles a day to de-stress and to observe the cities and the world around him.     What do you do to break your desk routine?

Let 5 eminent leaders convince you that walking meeting is a better idea

2 min read

Count this for yourself - how much time do you spend sitting on your desk in a day?

Quite a lot, right?

With technology at our disposal, we no longer need to put in too much physical efforts in getting things done now, as compared to let’s say 10 or 20 years back. We can get 100 things done without leaving the comfort of our throne. The point is - we are far too comfortable for our own good. Many of the ailments which were unheard till the previous generation have become rampant and are detrimental to our lives today, only because the activities that required us to be on our feet, literally, have dropped drastically. According to a WHO study, approximately 2 million deaths per year are attributed to physical inactivity. This research prompted WHO to issue a warning that a sedentary lifestyle could very well be among the 10 leading causes of death and disability in the world.

What we don’t realize is that, with simple changes in our choices, we can reverse the technology hangover and its offshoots. One way is - walking meetings. There’s no rule that says you can’t walk your meetings. Take quick strolls with your colleagues for ideation/brainstorm meetings, or important discussions. You can also request your clients or agencies for a walk for the meetings that don’t require a fancy presentation, projectors, and the whole enchilada.

Still, don’t think it’s a great idea? Let these 5 eminent leaders convince you to reconsider.


1 Aristotle

The great thinker, apparently, instructed students while strolling about. Come to think of it, this is one of the reasons why his students were called “Peripatetics.”


2 Sigmund Freud

The father of psychoanalysis conducted a number of walking analyses, according to ‘Freud: A Life for Our Time’. In 1907, he conducted his first training analysis on Max Eitingon through a series of evening walks. Eitingon late became the president of the International Psychoanalytic Association.


3 Steve Jobs

One of the biggest innovators of our times, Steve Jobs was a big fan of walking meetings and insisted on long walks for serious conversations.


4 Harry S. Truman

Walking was a fundamental part of Harry S. Truman’s daily routine. The 33rd president of the United States, according to the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, woke up at five in the morning for a “vigorous” walk “wearing a business suit and tie!”


5 Charles Dickens

It’s widely known that the eminent writer was actually “a compulsive walker”. Dickens despised sitting on his desk. He walked around 20 miles a day to de-stress and to observe the cities and the world around him.


What do you do to break your desk routine?




Himanshu Bhalla